At WAIMA, we spend a lot of time building the self-confidence of our adult members through adult martial arts training etc.

One area that increased confidence can be put to good use in is the job interview.

Here are a very few basic tips relating to projecting yourself more confidently in that type of situation.

Greetings

Make sure you greet the interviewer(s) positively.  That means walking up to them and looking them directly in the eye as you shake their hand. Avoid “hovering” aimlessly, simply waiting for them to come up to you.

Handshakes   

Try to avoid simply offering a “tips of the fingers” handshake, as that can signify timidity.

True, there are important differences between male and female psychology in this respect and women may be able to get away with more in terms of a reluctant handshake than men – but both should avoid it where possible.

Eyes

Maintain reasonably consistent eye contact with the other person. If there are several, try to distribute your eye contact reasonably equally from one to another but don’t look away from the person who is speaking to you.

Do try to avoid obsessively staring though because that can be a mixed signal – as we have covered before in other blogs.

Maintain equal status

Show you take yourself seriously and avoid using language that implies you are some sort of supplicant looking for favours from the master’s table.

You should be an equal player in the interview.  Remember, you are thinking whether you want to join them as much as they are thinking about whether or not to offer you a role.

Confirm this by using positive, assertive language such as:

  • “I’d like to know”
  • “I will be looking for”
  • “Could you please explain

Avoid:

  • If it’s not too much trouble”
  • “I’d be very grateful if you could possibly”
  • “I’m sorry to be difficult but could you please tell me”

Don’t apologise for who you are

Your potential employer has asked you in presumably because they liked the look of your CV and the skills you have.

Therefore, don’t subconsciously slip into apologising for what you are or are not.

Use:

  • “I don’t have any experience in that area”
  • “No, I don’t have that qualification”
  • “I left the last job because I wasn’t happy there.”

 Avoid:

  • “I’m really sorry but I have no experience of that”
  • “I really regret now not getting that qualification”
  • “I know it sounds bad but I left the last job because I wasn’t happy there.”

These are just a few basic tips but hopefully, they’ll come in handy the next time you are sitting in that job interview!